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The BBC has stated that every journalist who works on its Africa Eye investigation, sex-for-grades documentary gets credits as it was a team’s work.

BBC World Service, publicist Marina Forsythe made this known in a statement released today, revealing that the only exception is sequel to security considerations.

“Every Africa Eye investigation is a team effort and this has been key to the success and impact of our films. Everyone sufficiently involved in an investigation is given appropriate credit and the only exception is when there are security considerations,” Forsythe said.

It was gathered that a source told the online newspaper that a freelancer had no problem with revealing her identity was brought in because of the threats some BBC staff got after the ‘Sweet Codeine’ investigation revealing drug abuse problem in Nigeria.

BBC insiders also confirmed that Obidiebube was credited in the documentary using the pseudonym “Kemi Alabi”.

But the accolades and grants which been poured on Mordi as the star of the story proceed to open wounds.

A source said Obidiebube’s name was intentionally withdrawn due to some internal politics in BBC, asserting that one of the top managers was particular about not giving Obidiebube credits for the job done even before the documentary was finally released.

The source also claimed that the move created a stir in the BBC office to the point that the company clearly sent Obidiebube a letter of commendation to soothe her after the issue had escalated.

“We are deeply concerned about the welfare of our colleague Ogechi Obidiebube. Ogechi is receiving treatment in hospital and we are providing as much support as we can to her and her family. We request that people respect their privacy at this difficult time,” BBC said.

By 9jafresh

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